• Happy New Year 2015

The Words of Gurumayi’s Message for 2015

Definitions and Commentaries by Swami Shantananda and Maitreya Larios

About Maitreya Larios

Maitreya Larios is a Sanskrit scholar and a research fellow at the Heidelberg University in Germany, where he earned a PhD in classical Indology. He began practicing Siddha Yoga in 1990 and served on staff at Shree Muktananda Ashram during summers from 1996 to 1998. Maitreya lives in Heidelberg, Germany, with his wife, Anuradha, and one-year-old son, Kabir.

About Swami Shantananda

Swami Shantananda received shaktipat initiation from Baba Muktananda over forty years ago, when Baba gave him the mantra in Gurudev Siddha Peeth in Ganeshpuri, India. In meditation, Swamiji experienced the letters of the mantra dissolving into a vibrant, luminous power that rose up his spine to his head and gently wrapped itself around his mind. He then entered a deep inner space of silence and sweetness, from which he witnessed his quiet mind. Later, he learned from Baba that the Witness is the Supreme Self. He recognized, “This is who I am!” In 1977, he took monastic vows to become a Siddha Yoga Swami. Swami ji serves Gurumayi as a Siddha Yoga meditation teacher, drawing on his own profound experiences in sadhana and his extensive knowledge of the Indian scriptures. Swami Shantananda is the author of the book The Splendor of Recognition, an illuminating commentary on the Pratyabhijña-hrdayam, a key text of the philosophy of Kashmir Shaivism.

Updated: Jan 26 Updated: Jan 25
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I have read this definition and commentary on the word Meditate over and over, and I continue to find more lucid and supportive information in it. For one thing, it reminds me that instead of battling with my mind, trying to make it silent, feeling that I am not really meditating unless there are no thoughts, my effort should be to focus my mind in one direction—toward the Self.

Thank you, Swami Shantananda and Maitreya. When I even think about focusing on my breath, or the mantra, or remembering my Guru, I can feel my energy turning in toward my heart and my mind becoming happy. I’m going to renew my practice of letting the thoughts be what they are and turn my attention to guiding my mind back again and again to the space where it can be truly happy.

a Siddha Yogi from Michigan, USA

The paradox of the simultaneous immanence and transcendence of divine Consciousness intrigues me. Recently I was contemplating the paradox in being able to feel that immutable silence at the heart of the play of Consciousness. And so, in the midst of my ordinary daily activity, I enjoy the feeling of movement while remaining still within.

I love embracing this understanding: that we can be rock-solid and steadily anchored in this unchanging, timeless light, while at the same time we can dance in the play of this world, playing our particular part to the hilt and knowing that our actions can be inspired from that highest place within the heart.

I also recognize that I need to practice meditation faithfully to gain trust in my Self.

a Siddha Yogi from New Mexico, USA

The Message has introduced so many questions about the nature of time. I am so grateful for these definitions—they give rich nourishment to my mind, attune my focus, and fire up my longing to deepen my understanding. Thank you!

a Siddha Yogi from New York, USA

Two things stood out for me as I read this commentary on the word Meditate. The first was how sublime and exalted an understanding of meditation we are given on this path. The second was this phrase: our firm intention to experience the Self. I know that the divine power of grace is always with us. This phrase reminded me that my self-effort includes taking the time to mentally state my intention, and consciously renewing it each time I sit for meditation.

a Siddha Yogi from Massachusetts, USA