The Bee and the Elephant

About Jacqueline Murphy

Jacqueline began following the Siddha Yoga path in 1991 when she participated in a Siddha Yoga Shaktipat Intensive in Melbourne, Australia. She served on the staff of the SYDA Foundation for twelve years in management roles in Gurudev Siddha Peeth, and in Siddha Yoga Ashrams in Australia. Jacqueline has also offered seva as a speaker, coach, editor, and Live Events producer and director. She was the operations coordinator for the Siddha Yoga Chanting Tour: Australia.

At present, Jacqueline works as a journalist and filmmaker. She has a graduate certificate in Screen: Documentary from the Australian Film, TV, and Radio School, and she received formal qualifications as a journalist from a major Australian media company. Jacqueline currently lives in Sydney, Australia.

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What an eye-opening story this was! The flowers and their nectar signify for me the pleasures of life that I sometimes chase and the tendency to lose the sense of time flying by. If only the bee had gotten in touch with her sense of wisdom and balance and headed home rather than getting blinded by desire.
 
I do relate to this story. It strengthens my resolve to be even more mindful now of the time I have.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Mumbai, India

What powerfully resonates in my heart is the character of the sage. The sage is completely nonjudgmental, compassionate, respectful, reverent, and loving. This is my experience of Gurumayi—and of my inner Self. I find that when I can honor myself the way the sage honored Little Bee, I feel uplifted, free, and empowered to act in accordance with what is truly beneficial for me: that which aligns me with my Self and with the Truth.
 

a Siddha Yogi from California, USA

One thing that caught my attention in this story is how the bee was planning her future. She had in mind a gentle night’s sleep and then bringing all her friends back to her newfound nectar heaven. I saw myself in that bee in so many ways, trying to plan my future while all the ground beneath me changes. 
 
This story teaches me the importance of now—to stay present and practice the teachings every moment that I can. It also reminds me that I can never fully plan the future; it’s just a gift from God and no matter what package it comes in or what it contains, it’s a gift. And that gift is not about what I want, but about what I need to become who I truly am.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Florida, USA

What a delightful story! The character of Little Bee in “The Bee and the Elephant” is so likeable—and so easy to identify with. I've noticed that, like Little Bee, I can be easily distracted. Reading this story, I felt as if Baba Muktananda was saying to me, "Time is very valuable; do not waste it. Spend it in satsang." 
 

a Siddha Yogi from New Mexico, USA

I have never read such an exquisite story as this one, telling me to go home to the hive, leaving behind all the lotus petals which I come across, before it is too late and darkness falls over me.
 
The hive is my hearth and inside lives Gurumayi, inside lives the Truth.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Yautepec, Mexico

After reading the story, I felt that this was an excellent reminder for me who always promises to start the day early and go for exercise but then lingers in the cocoon of my bed. The lotus in my life is that bed, and the sage is my inner voice. So now I see that it's time to wake up and begin an exercise program before time runs out on me.
 
Thank you, Gurumayi ji, for opening my eyes and guiding me.

a Siddha Yogi from Mumbai, India

At the end of this story, I closed my eyes and saw Baba Muktananda smiling at me from within.
 
I frequently see myself as being like the bee as I engage in various distractions of modern life. However, it’s liberating to understand that the Truth is right here, within me, and I can connect with it simply by closing my eyes and turning my attention inside.
 

a Siddha Yogi from São Paulo, Brazil

Recently I have been pondering a major life-changing decision. Although I knew that it was time to take a step forward, I kept wavering, lingering, holding on. As I read this story, I immediately recognized myself in the bee's character, wanting to stay in my comfort zone although many signs have indicated that's it's time for me to change direction.
 
By the end of the story, I knew in my heart what I needed to do, and I took action based on my own inner knowing. I feel grateful for the certainty this story inspired in me.
 
Thank you, Gurumayi, for teaching us and guiding us in so many ways.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Toronto, Canada

I must admit, Little Bee’s relationship to the flowers bears an uncomfortable resemblance to my relationship to the internet. Sometimes I find that I’ve spent hours online with little or nothing to show for it.
 
One method I use to help me manage my relationship to the internet is to visit the Siddha Yoga path website every morning before I visit any other pages.
 
I’m so happy to have “landed” on this story about Little Bee this morning, a reminder that I can exercise my power to choose how I spend my precious time.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Massachusetts, USA

Reading this story has been an eye-opening experience for me, revealing the importance of time—a God-given gift that I sometimes take for granted.
 
During busy times, when my to-do list grows exponentially, steadfastness in my spiritual practices decreases proportionately. Sometimes I become so carried away by the distracting whirlwind of work, chores, and social commitments that it's almost impossible to squeeze in even a few minutes for sadhana.
 
 However, whenever I allow myself to pause, breathe, and reconnect with the Truth within, I have a glimpse of the eternal time deep inside my heart. Then, sadhana again becomes a top priority in my life, and I gracefully find plenty of time to engage in spiritual practices and to flow with my to-do list as well.
 

a Siddha Yogi from Buenos Aires, Argentina

This story reminds me how important it is to be connected with the Truth within. When I take time to connect with my inner Self, the outside distracting forces seem to disappear, and I can allow myself to receive the full power of the present moment.

Thank you, Gurumayi, for reminding me in such a creative way that now is the perfect time to make the effort and commit to my meditation practice with steadfastness.
 

A Siddha Yogi from Genova, Italy